UN Environment, Indonesian institute tie up against plastic pollution

Kelik Dewanto Antara 9 Jun 18;

Jakarta, (ANTARA News) - The United Nations (UN) Environment is partnering with the Indonesian Energy and Environmental Institute (IE2I) to campaign against plastic pollution in Indonesia.

IE2I`s Founder, Dyah Roro Esti Widya Putri, in a release received by Antara here on Saturday, said the anti-plastic campaign was urgent considering Indonesia was the second largest plastic pollutant contributor in the world.

The World Bank estimated that each of the 260 million Indonesian people was responsible for 0.8-1 kilogram of plastic waste a year.

According to her, the campaign needed the cooperation of all sections of society to strengthen awareness of the dangers of plastic waste.

"We are excited to welcome the call from UN Environment. It is time to more and more promote the anti-plastic campaign in Indonesia. On climate change issues, IE2I and Jakartagreener.e raised a theme, `Strategy Against Plastic Pollution in Indonesia`, to commemorate World Environment Day on June 5, " said Esti, accompanied by Jakartagreener.e`s CEO, Maria Bianca Vega.

The event was organised at the Rooftop Ramadan Food and Goods Market. Jakartagreener.e, a platform of social, environmental and creative event organisers, showcased eco-friendly handicraft products at the event.

"Visitors could bring plastic waste to the event, which would be processed by Waste4Change. It is a company that cares about plastic waste," said Bianca.

Meanwhile, IE2I Co-founder, Satya Hangga Yudha Widya Putra, said the target of the campaign against plastic pollution were young people or the millennial generation who were concerned about climate change and urbanisation issues.

"We invite the millennial generation to participate in the event and increase their awareness about plastic pollution in Indonesia. If young people join the action, then we are optimistic that all sections of society will be moved to make Indonesia free waste by 2020," he said.

According to Hangga, the campaign invitation to the millennials was expected to go viral through social media.

"We hope that the millennials are aware of the dangers of plastic waste and its negative impact on the environment. It is our common task to publicise how to prevent and control plastic waste in Indonesia," he said.

Indonesia is the second largest contributor of marine waste after China. "The Indonesian government has committed to reduce marine waste by 70 per cent by 2025," note Hangga.

On the same occasion, Waste4change`s Project Officer, Pandu Prijambodo, said all sections of society should be able to collaborate in helping the government achieve the goal of being plastic waste-free by 2025. "If we do not do anything, then in 2050 the Indonesian ocean will be full of plastic waste, not fish anymore," he said.


(KR-LWA/INE/B003)

EDITED BY INE

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